Sep
8
Sat
2018
Lecture By Dr. Marion T. Lane: 12 Women of Color Who Made a Difference
Sep 8 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Lecture By Dr. Marion T. Lane: 12 Women of Color Who Made a Difference @ The Library Company of Philadelphia | Philadelphia | PA | US

12 Women of Color Who Made a Difference during the Era of the American Revolution

Saturday, September 8

12:00pm – 2:00pm

In partnership with Association for the Study of African American Life and History – Philadelphia Heritage


About the Speaker: Dr. Marion T. Lane has been a member of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution since October 2006. She has served on the Board of Valley Forge National Historical Park and the Museum of the American Revolution and has served as the Commander in Chief (National President) of the Society of Descendants of Washington’s Army at Valley Forge. Her two books, Patriots of African Descent in the Revolutionary War and More than One Ancestry focus on the African American and Native American peoples that contributed to the Revolutionary War.

Sep
18
Tue
2018
Networks of Engravers in Early 19th-Century Philadelphia
Sep 18 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Networks of Engravers in Early 19th-Century Philadelphia @ The Library Company of Philadelphia | Philadelphia | PA | US

Networks of Engravers in Early 19th-Century Philadelphia

Tuesday, September 18

5:30pm – 7:00pm

Sponsored by the Visual Culture Program 


In the first decade of the 1800s, the engraver William Kneass severed his professional relationship with the Philadelphia-based engraver James Akin. The two men would pursue engraving projects separately. Although no artistic evidence has survived linking these engravers on future professional endeavors, an 1809 invoice between the men, found in the collections at the Library Company of Philadelphia, does. Kneass worked on everything from medical labels, to door knockers, to trade cards for Akin. He also worked on William Birch’s engraving The City of New York (1803). However, the finished print contains not Akin, nor Kneass’s name, but those of Birch and Samuel Seymour, an engraver whom Birch had collaborated with previously

This is not surprising. The Akin-Kneass invoice provides an informative glimpse into the collaborative nature of the “mechanical arts” in the first decade of the 1800s when artistic evidence is often rare.  This talk will use this important document as a means to explore the engravers active in early 19th- century Philadelphia and how they were trained, their working practices, and the artistic networks they forged.

About the Speaker:
Allison M. Stagg is an art historian with a focus on American art and visual culture. She has previously held positions in the Department of Drawings and Prints at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and in the American Studies Department at the Johannes Gutenberg Universität in Mainz. From 2016 to 2017 she was the Terra Foundation Visiting Professor in American Art History at the John F. Kennedy Institute for 

North American Studies, Freie Universität. She is completing a manuscript on the history of political caricature prints in the United States published between 1780 and 1830.

Oct
5
Fri
2018
William Birch and the Complexities of American Visual Culture: A Symposium Celebrating the Tenth Anniversary of the Visual Culture Program
Oct 5 @ 8:00 am – 4:30 pm
William Birch and the Complexities of American Visual Culture: A Symposium Celebrating the Tenth Anniversary of the Visual Culture Program @ The Library Company of Philadelphia | Philadelphia | Pennsylvania | United States

William Birch and the Complexities of American Visual Culture: A Symposium Celebrating the Tenth Anniversary of the Visual Culture Program

Friday, October 5

8:00am – 4:30pm

Sponsored by the Visual Culture Program 


In celebration of the tenth anniversary of the Visual Culture Program, William Birch and the Complexities of American Visual Cultureexplores the visual, cultural, and social themes elicited from the work of Philadelphia artist William Birch (1755-1834). The one-day symposium in collaboration with William Birch, Ingenious Artist: His Life, His Philadelphia Views, and His Legacy aims to promote broad discussions on the continual resonance in American visual culture of the work of this premier enamel miniaturist, aspiring gentleman, and artist of the first American viewbooks.

This is not surprising. The Akin-Kneass invoice provides an informative glimpse into the collaborative nature of the “mechanical arts” in the first decade of the 1800s when artistic evidence is often rare.  This talk will use this important document as a means to explore the engravers active in in early 19th- century Philadelphia and how they were trained, their working practices, and the artistic networks they forged.

Panelists:

Keynote Address

Wendy Bellion, University of Delaware

The Birch Network and Diaspora

William Birch, Painter-Architect
William L. Coleman, Newark Museum

Rendering the American Landscape: William Birch, Benjamin Henry Latrobe, and the British Watercolor Diaspora
Julia A. Sienkewicz, Roanoke College

The Urban Aesthetic in Popular Art

What William Birch Left Out: The Visual Culture of Disability in Early America
Nicole Belolan, Consortium for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine

James Kidder’s Market: Urban Views and the Art of Commerce
Whitney Martinko, Villanova University

Nicolino Calyo’s Wider View: Landscapes of Innovation
Rebecca Szantyr, Brown University

Novelty in Graphic Art: Horizontoriums, Miniature Photos, and Grangerizing

Distorting Views of Philadelphia: Shifting Perspectives in “A Curious Horizontorium”
Laura Turner Igoe, Barnes Foundation

Tiny Mysteries: Decoding 19th-Century Microscopic Photographs from Philadelphia’s Langenheim Brothers
Daniel Seth Kraus and Byron Wolfe, Tyler School of Art, Temple University

Taking a Page from Tuckerman’s Book of the Artists: Nineteenth-Century Print Media and the Grangerization of American Art History
Erin Pauwels, Tyler School of Art, Temple University

Final Remarks

Elizabeth Milroy, Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design at Drexel University

Learn More About the Symposium and Panelists